Impul Window Visor Installation Guide (For Infiniti Q50)

Impul's Window Visors are some of the highest quality visors available on the market. Not only do they have superb fit and finish compared to lower priced competitors, but they offer extended features and styling to compliment your car.






Installation Instructions

1. Wash and clean the exterior of your car.

2. Remove all of the components from the box and inspect them for any damage or missing parts. You should have a pair of front and rear window visors, 8 window tabs, 8 tap-in bolts and a preparation wipe. We recommend having an additional pair of hands, painter’s tape, scissors and a flathead screwdriver (optional)

3. Remove each of the window tabs from the molded bracket. Make sure to trim the top of the tab to make the top completely flat with scissors.


4. Roll down all of the windows in the car.

5. Wipe down the exterior mounting surface where the visors will sit with soap and water, then once its dry wipe down again with the included primer wipe to make sure you have a clean surface to install the window visors. Wash your hands after handling the wipe.

6. You will see two holes on each visor. Align a window visor with the corresponding window frame, and take note of where the holes are.

7. There is a rubber seal with a narrow gap directly underneath the mounting surface. Gently pry the gap open with your fingernail or with a flathead screwdriver and insert the window tab into the gap. The hole for the tap-in bolt has a collar, this collar should be facing away from the window and towards the interior of the car. (Tip: Use electrical tape on the tip of your screwdriver to prevent any marring.)


8. Begin peeling a very small edge of the double-sided tape on one of the front window visors as shown in the instructions, then flip up the tape backing strip so it protrudes on the side. Make sure to do this for all sides on each strip.


9. Cut four or five strips of the painter’s tape and use it to hold the visor in place as you align it.
 
10. Check to see that the visor is aligned the way you want it to be. Once you’re happy with how it sits, grab the exposed backing strip you flipped up and slowly begin to peel the tape upwards, putting pressure on the areas of the visor you just peeled the backing from. 

11. Once the tape has been fully removed, put pressure on the visor where the adhesive is and hold for 15-20 seconds. Do this in sections until you’ve covered the whole visor.



12. Re-align the window tabs in the weather seal’s gap with the hole in the visor if needed, then place one of the tap-in bolts through it. Do this for both holes.


13. Get the rear visor for the side you put the front visor on and start to align it so you can put the window tabs in. When aligning the front of the rear visor with the backside of the front visor, make sure you put a 3mm gap to ensure adequate clearance so the rear visor does not rub against the front visor when the door is opened.


14. Place the window tabs in the rear seal’s gap like you did for the front visors.

15. Peel a small section of the backing strip from the double-sided tape and flip the backing strip so it sticks out when viewed from the front. Do this for all pieces of double-sided tape on this visor.

16. Align and secure the visor with 4-5 strips of painter’s tape.

17. Grab the exposed backing strip you flipped up and slowly begin to peel the tape upwards, putting pressure on the areas of the visor you just peeled the backing from.

18. Once the tape has been fully removed, put pressure on the visor where the adhesive is and hold for 15-20 seconds. Do this in sections until you’ve covered the whole visor.

19. Re-align the window tabs in the weather seal’s gap with the hole in the visor, then place one of the tap-in bolts through it. Do this for both holes.

20. Repeat instructions 6 through 19 for the other side.

FULLY INSTALLED PRODUCT

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One (Hub) Ring to Rule Them All - The Truth About these Rings


Hub rings, along with the wheels they are coupled with are often subjects of “misleading information.” Although their function is simple and straightforward, there are many myths about them. Their function, the types of materials they are made from, and the story behind their creation has been subjected to a game of telephone which has lasted far too long. As a result, we feel that it is necessary to clear the air on this topic.

A hub ring, in its simplest form is a reducer bushing. When the wheel/tire is being mounted on the car, the hub ring helps non-hub centric wheels to be truer to the center of the hub by filling in any gaps. A common misconception is that there is constant stress being applied to the hub ring, which is in fact, false. As soon as the lug nuts/bolts are fitted and torqued down, all stresses on the hub ring are removed.

In the 1970s, a company named Western wheel was contracted in to make OEM wheels for GM’s Pontiac Firebird. General Motors asked for the wheels to be hubcentric with a tolerance of .400 for the mounting surface, an amount that is near impossible to see with the naked eye. Within a few months of the vehicle being available for sale, a handful of Firebirds were coming back to dealerships on flatbed trucks. Customers complained that they had gotten a flat tire and they were unable to remove the wheel off the hub; the culprit was galvanic corrosion.

                Galvanic corrosion is a phenomenon that occurs when two dissimilar metals (in this case, an aluminum alloy wheel and a steel wheel hub) come into contact whilst in the presence of an electrolyte. This can cause the location where these two metals meet to rust, making it very difficult to remove wheels if the corrosion is significant enough. In places where road salt is used, galvanic corrosion can happen very quickly with catastrophic results.

                In the early 80s, Chrysler partnered with the late Carroll Shelby to develop a limited-edition Dodge Dakota. Chrysler required the wheel hub to be created from a material that would be impervious to galvanic corrosion from aluminum wheels. Ron Pushea, a mechanical engineer and machinist specializing in vehicle componentry became involved in the Dakota project. Ron’s suggestion was to have the center bore of the wheel to be enlarged, with a sleeving to go over the wheel hub, acting as an O-ring to protect it from any corrosion. This polycarbonate sleeve became known as the hub ring.


Ron’s decision to use polycarbonate was an excellent one; polycarbonate exhibits high temperature and impact resistance, making it stronger than nylon/ABS plastic yet it is immune from Galvanic Corrosion compared to raw aluminum hub rings. In 1994, Ron developed a business called Prestige Wheel and continues to manufacture polycarbonate hub rings to this day.

From what has been presented above, we can deduce the benefits provided by polycarbonate hub rings when used in the correct applications. In the case where the wheels are nonhubcentric, it is always an option to use a hub ring when experiencing unwanted vibrations and to accurately center the wheel.  All hub rings available for sale on Footwork Autosport are manufactured using polycarbonate in the U.S.A.; we strive to bring you only the best parts available. WedsSport hubcentric center caps for the TC-105X have been anodized for resistance against galvanic corrosion. 

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